Posts

Do You Know the Coca-Cola Story and the Christian Connection?

By: Graham McDonald

The flowing copperplate script with red and white colours is a logo that is recognisable around the world. Its success is due to Asa Candler, whose primary motivation in all he attempted was to be faithful to God through his stewardship. Read more

Banjo Paterson’s Forgotten ANZAC Role: One of the Least-Known Parts of His Life

By: Annie Hamilton

Main image: Australian bush poet A.B. ‘Banjo’ Paterson. Inset: Light Horseman Private Richard Harwell Bryant on his waler, the kind of horse broken in and trained by Banjo Paterson. Bryant died aged only 38 while serving in Beirut, Syria, 1918. Photo: Australian War Memorial. All photos: Public Domain

Those tough Aussie horses, broken in and trained for the exact task before them, struggled in the soft, burning Middle Eastern sand, their fetlocks sinking deep in the desert hills. Read more

The Architect of Anzac Day

By: Graham McDonald

Our History and the Christian Connection

The catch cry of Canon David Garland was “nothing is too good for our soldier boys”. It epitomises the heart of a man dedicated to the soldiers he served.
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The Origins of National Children’s Week

By: Graham McDonald

19 – Sunday 27 October 2019

Throughout the history of mankind, the natural progression of life has been a birth ultimately followed by death at some point in time, except for a few notable exceptions that are recorded in the Holy Scriptures.
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The Sydney Morning Herald – Our History and the Christian Connection

By: Karen Schneider

John and Sarah Fairfax after fourteen years of hard work in growing their business in Leamington, England, stood in the place that was John’s printing business and Sarah’s bookshop, bankrupt. Unable to continue.
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The Man Who Named Australia – Matthew Flinders

By: Graham McDonald

Our History and the Christian Connection

For over two hundred years, the final resting place of the man ultimately responsible for the naming of ‘Australia’ was lost. Then in early 2019, his lead-plated coffin was discovered at the back of a train station in London.
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Queen Elizabeth ll – Longest serving English monarch

By: Graham McDonald

Did you know that Queen Elizabeth II had two ceremonies to mark the beginning of her public office? The first was her coronation as Queen but the second was her ‘coronation’ as God’s servant. In this second untelevised ceremony, the Queen stood dressed in a simple white dress, devoid of decoration. Read more

Banjo Paterson’s Role as an ANZAC: One of the Least Known Parts of His Life

By: Annie Hamilton

‘Banjo’ Paterson is immortalised on our ten dollar note. His role in the Anzac battalions is one of the least-known parts of his life. It has slipped to obscurity, perhaps because—mysteriously—he never wrote a poem about the great Walers he worked so hard to train. Or if he did, none have survived. Read more

The Founder of Cadbury Was a Social Activist

By: Annie Hamilton

If you’ve ever travelled to the Cadbury factory in Claremont, Tasmania – or to Bourneville in the UK, you may know a little of their remarkable history. Read more

Coles Supermarket Founder Paid for Billy Graham’s Crusade TV Broadcast

By: Annie Hamilton

‘Are you a millionaire, daddy?’ Judith asked her father. It was not long after decimal currency had been introduced into Australia.

‘No,’ he replied. ‘But it will make it a lot easier for me to get there now that the pound is worth two dollars.’ Read more